Hazardous Chemicals – EU Adopts Standardised Reporting

October 28, 2019 | Insights,
[DISPLAY_ULTIMATE_SOCIAL_ICONS]
Warning signs for hazardous chemicals

The way that companies in the EU notify poison centers of hazardous chemicals in products could change as soon as January 2020.

What does it mean for you?

Ever noticed a red diamond-shaped symbol on the pack of DIY, gardening and household cleaning products? This is a often referred to as a ‘pictogram’, and tells you about the hazardous nature of the product, including what to do if it comes into contact with skin.

These pictograms and the associated text are on the label because of a piece of EU legislation called the Classification, Labelling and Packaging of Substances and Mixtures, or CLP.  This is designed to communicate the hazard posed by a product or substance.

Here are three examples of the nine commonly used hazard symbols found on product labels.

Worker mixing cleaning chemicals

Hazardous Chemicals and Products

Just like those cleaning or DIY products, most of the chemicals we use, whether in the home, in industry or by professionals, are products made up of mixtures of substances.

If the product is classified as hazardous then the company producing it must notify their national poisons centre. These are organisations staffed by experts in medical toxicology who provide advice on what to do in cases of accidental or deliberate chemical exposure.

Poison centers in each EU country keep a database of all the hazardous products notified to them so that, if someone has been exposed to a product, the poison center can give advice on what to do (the phone number should be on the label).

Until recently, the ways in which companies notify the poison centers has varied from country to country. For example, in the UK notification is by a simple e-mail, whereas in other countries the process is more complex.

Also, some countries charge a fee while others do not. For multinational companies that must notify in several countries this system is cumbersome and inefficient.

The agency that manages chemical regulation across the EU, ECHA, has been looking at this issue over the past couple of years and is introducing a more  streamlined system.

Example of hazardous chemicals label

Changes to Poison Center Notifications

In future, all product notifications will be in a standardised format know as a PCN, or Poison Center Notification.

Companies will have three notification options. They will be able to:

  • Submit their data directly online via a secure portal
  • Enter their data offline into a dossier that is then uploaded via the portal
  • Allow the data to be extracted directly from internal systems such as SAP and the notification generated automatically, saving considerable time and resources.

Companies Will Need to Prepare

What is becoming clear is that much more comprehensive data will be required than has been required before.

For example, under the new system the full chemical composition of hazardous products must be disclosed, including solvents, emulsifiers, fillers and the like. Previously, it was enough to specify the hazardous ingredients.

Toxicology data and information will also be required on the packaging. So companies will have to carry out a lot of basic work to characterise all of their products even before they can go through the notification process.

A new feature on product labels is a 16-digit code called the Unique Formulation Identifier, or UFI, as in this example.

The code is unique to each product and will enable staff at poison centers to rapidly access the full database on the product’s hazards and give precise advice on treatment. This will be far more efficient than relying on a product name, which may be used on several different products, or searching for some other code on the label.

This example of a UFI code on a label is from a brochure produced by ECHA called The UFI and What it Means for Your Product Labels, which contains useful information.

Deadlines to Report Hazardous Chemicals

If they have not already done so, companies will have to move quickly to start compiling the information required for these notifications.

For all new products and for any existing product that is being updated, such as with a new formulation or new packaging, the deadlines for submission are:

Consumer products By 01 January 2020 (currently under review)
Professional products By 01 January 2021
Industrial products By 01 January 2024

How Can Anthesis Help?

Anthesis has a team of experts who are well-versed in the requirements of chemical regulations, having been involved in the implementation of the REACH regulation on behalf of international clients in recent years.

We have the knowledge and experience to understand your requirements and to collect the necessary data and make the notifications. Furthermore, through the Anthesis Compliance Suite, we can fully utilise the option of making an automated submission.

About the author

Chris Turner has over twenty years’ experience of regulation in the chemical industry, the last ten years working primarily on REACH and CLP. Chris supports clients covering a wide range of sectors and his recent work has focused on following the development of regulations relating to endocrine disruptors and advising clients on how these will impact on their products.

Contact us

We'd love to hear from you

Anthesis has offices in the U.S., Canada, Colombia, the UK, Ireland, Italy, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Andorra, Finland, China, the Philippines and the Middle East.

[hubspot type=form portal=3887711 id=615ca462-bdcc-4537-8360-ec12f2372585]

Organisational and Supply Chain Carbon Footprint for Belu Water

September 27, 2019 | Case Study,
[DISPLAY_ULTIMATE_SOCIAL_ICONS]

“Anthesis has been instrumental in helping us quantify our carbon footprint and understand where our biggest opportunities lie over the years. This long-term support has allowed us to reach carbon neutrality and maintain our status as the UK’s most ethical water brand.”

Nolan Wright, Head of Operations, Belu.

Belu is a UK based water services provider that operates as an ethical business and social enterprise. As an exclusive bottled water partner of WaterAid it donates all its profits to fund clean water projects.

Belu’s unrivalled commitment to ethical and responsible business practices is evidenced in the 20 plus awards it has won.

In 2017, Belu was presented with the highly prestigious Queen’s Award for Enterprise in Sustainable Development. The company was honored for demonstrating continuous reductions in CO2 emissions, constantly seeking new ways to reduce environmental impact and creating net positive outcomes both environmentally and socially.

The Project

Belu endeavors to set the environmental benchmark in its sector and be an environmental brand first. To maintain this position, Belu needed to reach its carbon reduction targets as set out in its carbon strategy and demonstrate its commitment to carbon neutrality.

Anthesis has a long-standing relationship with the team at Belu and we are responsible for carrying out the company’s organisational and supply chain carbon footprint and helping it to demonstrate carbon neutrality in compliance with the PAS 2060 standard on an annual basis.

For this project Anthesis provided:

  • A full life cycle footprint of Belu’s range of products, covering raw materials, transport, bottling, distribution, product use and end of life, plus an organisational carbon footprint including the London office.
  • Documentation and checks required for Belu to demonstrate carbon neutrality and commit to carbon neutrality, in conformance with PAS2060.

Key Project Outputs

  • Organisational and supply chain carbon footprint
  • Annual report with a breakdown by type of product and insights into reductions achieved
  • PAS 2060 statement.

Contact us

We'd love to hear from you

Anthesis has offices in the U.S., Canada, Colombia, the UK, Ireland, Italy, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Andorra, Finland, China, the Philippines and the Middle East.

[hubspot type=form portal=3887711 id=615ca462-bdcc-4537-8360-ec12f2372585]

Sustainability Reporting and Brand Communications

June 3, 2019 | Guidance,
[DISPLAY_ULTIMATE_SOCIAL_ICONS]

“I’ve worked with several teams and individuals within Anthesis and have been continually impressed by the quality and concerted effort they put into delivering value to our business through our sustainability programs.”

Jaclyn Allen Director of Corporate Sustainability, GUESS?, Inc.

“It was a joy working with Anthesis. They provided a wealth of experience in enabling us to understand the nuances of the metrics so that we could put our best foot forward in our sustainability report. In short, I give Anthesis my highest recommendation as a Corporate Responsibility partner and publisher, and I would not hesitate to work with them again.”

VP Investor Relations, Leading Technology Firm

Anthesis offers pragmatic support for sustainability reporting, helping companies and organisations find value in what can otherwise be a time consuming, complicated and sometimes expensive process.

Benefits of Sustainability Reporting

Every organisation’s needs are different so we offer a wide range of services to help plan, write and design sustainability reports:

  • Identify and understand emerging risks and opportunities that your organization may face, and how those translate into your material topics.
  • Target your communications to the needs of your key stakeholders – employees, investors, customers, NGOs, regulators.
  • Align your report with best practice reporting frameworks including the Global Reporting Initiative Standards, International Integrated Reporting Council, Sustainability Accounting Standards Board, Dow Jones Sustainability Reporting Index), Carbon Disclosure Project, UN Global Compact and others.
  • Create a repository of answers to stakeholders’ questions.
  • Use the reporting process to drive ownership and accountability of sustainability performance into the business, as well as measure performance improvement.
  • Connect your reporting process and focus areas to the business and to commercial strategy.
  • Build and protect your reputation.

Sustainability Reporting Experience

We work with organisations both large and small across the world to help them develop sustainability reporting and communications most relevant for their key stakeholders. Our clients include:

Arista Networks • Bose • Cisco • CMC • Colas • Exponent PE • Guess?, Inc.• Kingfisher • Lindsay Corporation • Maxim Integrated • Melco • Network Rail • Provident Financial • Tesco • The North Face • Urban & Civic • YOOX Net-a-Porter •

For more information contact Ben Tuxworth.

Contact us

We'd love to hear from you

Anthesis has offices in the U.S., Canada, Colombia, the UK, Ireland, Italy, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Andorra, Finland, China, the Philippines and the Middle East.

[hubspot type=form portal=3887711 id=615ca462-bdcc-4537-8360-ec12f2372585]

Chemicals of Concern: Part One, ECHA Database

May 7, 2019 | Insights,
[DISPLAY_ULTIMATE_SOCIAL_ICONS]
Logo of the European Chemicals Agency

Recycling is a critical step on the path to a circular economy, but is it also a route to the ‘toxic recirculation’ of harmful chemicals? Jennifer Haggerty provides an update on the emerging role of ECHA’s Waste Framework Directive database in achieving a circular economy.

Chemicals – including chemicals of concern – can be released during recycling or reprocessed into new products that were never intended to contain them, creating potential hazards for workers, consumers and the environment.

Update on candidate list substances

A lot has happened since the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) held its workshop on the Waste Framework Directive database last year. The database looks set to be critical in ensuring material transparency, a key requirement for a circular economy.

However, due to cost constraints ECHA is now developing a scaled-down prototype, in order to test IT requirements and stakeholder interactions. The EU Commission has rejected a request from industry to contribute to the development of the database.

Also rejected was a request, made in an open letter from 17 industrial associations, urging the Commission to halt the consideration of results of its feasibility study, On the Use of Comprehensive Tools to Manage Information Flows from Product Supply Chains to Waste Operators.

Most recently, we heard that ECHA is working closely with the developers of the AskREACH app and database, which also aims to collect and share information about substances of high concern. However, different timelines and mandates mean that merging the two projects is not possible.

About the ECHA database

Under amended Article 9 of the EU Waste Directive, ECHA is required to establish the database where companies that produce, import, or sell articles that contain candidate list substances – substances of very high concern (SVHC) – can fulfill their obligation to submit relevant information on those articles.

The intended audiences for the database are waste treatment operators and consumers, and the intention is that operators could use the database to better treat waste and recycle materials.

The database will contribute to the EU’s circular economy policy with the aim of encouraging non-toxic material cycles by increasing visibility into the supply chain.

The requirements for companies to submit data supplement the current notification and supply chain communication requirements that already exist for SVHCs in articles. The additional information requirements proposed by ECHA’s technical supporting document, particularly the unique identifier for each article, raised concern among the stakeholders during the public consultation.

Currently, under REACH Article 7(2), a company must notify ECHA if they produce or import an article that contains an SVHC at greater than 0.1 percent (w/w) within the article, and the total SVHC produced or imported is greater than tonne per year. Under REACH Article 33, a company must communicate through their supply chain if they provide an article containing an SVHC at greater than 0.1 percent. If a consumer requests information about SVHCs at greater than 0.1 percent in their articles, companies have 45 days to reply.

The database looks set to be critical in ensuring material transparency, a key requirement for a circular economy.

Objectives for the ECHA database

ECHA held its workshop last October to engage authorities and stakeholders from member states in discussions on practical pieces of the new requirements.

To help frame discussions, ECHA outlined three main objectives for the future database:

  • Decrease generation of hazardous waste by supporting the substitution of SVHCs in articles.
  • Monitor the use of SVHCs.
  • Provide information to improve waste treatment operations.

In addition to discussing the draft scenario created by ECHA for the database, the workshop also organised break-out sessions to discuss key questions facing ECHA and industry. These included, but were not limited to: how to avoid overlaps in notification, what information is needed, and how can data be submitted?

The database discussions and practical implementation are an ongoing story. As it develops, additional information will be provided.

Initial reactions

The European Recycling Industries’ Confederation (EuRIC) published a position paper on the database in September 2018. While the confederation welcomed a centralised location for information gathering that will help improve traceability of substances in material streams, it also had some reservations.

Some of these concerns were that:

  • The requirement for the database overlaps with waste requirements under other directives (such as end-of-life vehicles and waste electrical and electronic equipment).
  • That the database will not be retroactive, so as new substances are classified as SVHCs the database will not provide updated information.
  • That for the database to be useful for waste operators, the level of detail needed would be much higher than that required by consumers.

Key information

Who?

Companies that produce, import or sell articles that contain candidate list substances.

What type of data might ECHA require to be submitted?

ECHA may require administrative company data, data about the article or complex object, data about the Candidate List substance, and safe use information.

When?

05 January 2020: ECHA to establish the database.

End of 2020: companies to submit data.

How Anthesis Can Help

If your company is likely to be impacted by this requirement, contact Jennifer Haggerty for more information and keep checking back for news about further developments. In the meantime, read more about the database here.

About the author

Jennier Haggerty_consultant_Anthesis3Jennifer Haggerty supports clients in finding effective solutions for their global regulatory and sustainable chemistry needs. She offers an exceptionally broad understanding of the global regulatory landscape and assists clients in conforming to a variety of chemical regulations including US HCS, TSCA, REACH, Prop 65, and consumer product labeling.


References

European Chemicals Agency. Workshop on Waste Framework Directive database.  

European Recycling Industries’ Confederation. Position of the European Recycling Industries’ Confederation, ECHA Database on Candidate List substances.

ECHA’s Technical Supporting Document to the draft scenario for the database on articles containing Candidate List substances.


Download our free chemical management and compliance guide to see how we can support you to make positive change to your organisation. 

Contact us

We'd love to hear from you

Anthesis has offices in the U.S., Canada, Colombia, the UK, Ireland, Italy, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Andorra, Finland, China, the Philippines and the Middle East.

[hubspot type=form portal=3887711 id=615ca462-bdcc-4537-8360-ec12f2372585]

The Ecodesign Directive as a Way to Reduce Microplastic from Household Laundry

February 27, 2019 | Case Study,
[DISPLAY_ULTIMATE_SOCIAL_ICONS]

Our study determined that a filter criterion has potential to achieve reduced emissions from microplastics for new washing machines.

Agencies in Sweden asked Anthesis to assess the feasibility of introducing Ecodesign criteria to reduce microplastics released from textiles when they are washed.

The Project

The washing and wearing of textiles is one of the sources of microplastic fibres that has raised increased concern in recent years, and is a primary source of microplastics from the textile sector in Sweden. However, textile production takes place almost entirely outside Sweden and the EU, meaning regulations would require international commitment. But as international commitments are harder to enforce, it was easier to focus on options at an EU-level.

With this in mind, the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, in collaboration with the Swedish Energy Agency, wanted to examine the problem from a socio-economic perspective, by investigating the feasibility of requiring microplastic filters in the Ecodesign regulation for washing machines.

The study provides a structure for analysing the performance of policy instruments concerning microplastics and demonstrates the potential socio-economic impacts of implementing a filter requirement.

Key Services Delivered

  • Literature review of documents about the ecodesign directive and impacts from emissions of microplastics.
  • Policy instrument analysis.
  • Socio-economic impact assessment.

Swedish microplastic and laundry graph

Figure 1: effect on target vs cost effectiveness of various socio-economic and policy measures for preventing or reducing plastic pollution.

Key Outputs

Our study determined that a filter criterion has potential to achieve reduced emissions from microplastics for new washing machines (the second hand market was not included). The effect will depend on how the Ecodesign requirements are specified, the performance of the filters and how consumers handle the filters.

For further information get in touch with Analyst Henrik Nordzell.

Contact us

We'd love to hear from you

Anthesis has offices in the U.S., Canada, Colombia, the UK, Ireland, Italy, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Andorra, Finland, China, the Philippines and the Middle East.

[hubspot type=form portal=3887711 id=615ca462-bdcc-4537-8360-ec12f2372585]

The Ecodesign Directive as a Way to Reduce Microplastic from Household Laundry

[DISPLAY_ULTIMATE_SOCIAL_ICONS]

Our study determined that a filter criterion has potential to achieve reduced emissions from microplastics for new washing machines.

Agencies in Sweden asked Anthesis to assess the feasibility of introducing Ecodesign criteria to reduce microplastics released from textiles when they are washed.

The Project

The washing and wearing of textiles is one of the sources of microplastic fibres that has raised increased concern in recent years, and is a primary source of microplastics from the textile sector in Sweden. However, textile production takes place almost entirely outside Sweden and the EU, meaning regulations would require international commitment. But as international commitments are harder to enforce, it was easier to focus on options at an EU-level.

With this in mind, the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, in collaboration with the Swedish Energy Agency, wanted to examine the problem from a socio-economic perspective, by investigating the feasibility of requiring microplastic filters in the Ecodesign regulation for washing machines.

The study provides a structure for analysing the performance of policy instruments concerning microplastics and demonstrates the potential socio-economic impacts of implementing a filter requirement.

Key Services Delivered

  • Literature review of documents about the ecodesign directive and impacts from emissions of microplastics.
  • Policy instrument analysis.
  • Socio-economic impact assessment.

Swedish microplastic and laundry graph

Figure 1: effect on target vs cost effectiveness of various socio-economic and policy measures for preventing or reducing plastic pollution.

Key Outputs

Our study determined that a filter criterion has potential to achieve reduced emissions from microplastics for new washing machines (the second hand market was not included). The effect will depend on how the Ecodesign requirements are specified, the performance of the filters and how consumers handle the filters.

For further information get in touch with Analyst Henrik Nordzell.

Greener Products: Applying Hotspots Analysis

April 3, 2018 | Insights,
[DISPLAY_ULTIMATE_SOCIAL_ICONS]

“A methodological framework that allows for the rapid assimilation and analysis of a range of information sources, including life-cycle based and market information, scientific research, expert opinion and stakeholder concerns.

United Nations Environment Programme

In this instalment of our Greener Products series, we explore the value of hotspots analysis as a key element to inform decision making.

In particular, we look at how businesses across the appliance sector collaborated to develop a series of product sustainability standards where hotspots analysis played a prominent role.

To begin with an introduction to hotspots analysis, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) – now UN Environment – described hotspots analysis as: “a methodological framework that allows for the rapid assimilation and analysis of a range of information sources, including life-cycle based and market information, scientific research, expert opinion and stakeholder concerns.”

In 2017 UNEP/SETAC developed a methodological framework to conducting a hotspots analysis comprised of eight steps to follow (see Figure 5.5).

The benefits of hotspots analysis include ensuring:

  • Focus on priority issues (e.g., waste, water, materials of concern)
  • Focus on the right life cycle stage (e.g., material acquisition, manufacturing, use, end of life)
  • Focus on the right actors (e.g., producers, manufacturers, suppliers, retailers, customers, government officials) to evaluate, influence and implement solutions
  • Implications of trade-offs are understood
  • Resources (e.g., time, money) can be effectively allocated to actions.

What makes the appliance sector a unique case study is how they used hotspots analysis with the intent to inform each company’s innovation practices by developing product sustainability standards to provide the priority impacts and performance levels the companies can target to develop the next generation of products which are more sustainable.

The appliance sector went beyond life cycle assessment (LCA) to incorporate scientific studies, existing standards, stakeholder interests, insights from subject matter experts, and input from members of the value chain towards a resulting hotspots analysis to guide their product sustainability standards. An example was AHAM Sustainability Standard for Household Refrigeration Appliances[1].

The appliance sector case demonstrates the following three advancements in methodology.

Collaborative Stakeholder Engagement

This collaborative approach drew from the strengths of both a private and a consensus approach, using feedback from stakeholders and subject matter experts, and involved testing the draft standard prior to the accreditation. Benefits of this collaborative approach include the high transparency, high credibility, speed of development and low cost.

The collaborative approach is a mix of two approaches:

  • Optimises strengths of each approach to achieve common end goal
  • Stakeholder input plus expert judgment
  • May involve testing of draft standard prior to accreditation.

Broader Input

By broadening the hotspots analysis beyond LCA, the final hotspots were influenced by the LCA results, expert knowledge, stakeholder input, and scientific knowledge. An immediate implication was the realization that if hotspots analysis was based on the results of LCA studies alone, energy in the use stage would have taken 70 percent of the total impact scoring.

But by considering this broader input, materials of concern, manufacturing and end of life management were also determined to be important. As a result, the energy in the use stage accounted for 45 percent of the final impact scoring.

Inform the Specific Targets

The hotspots analysis is intended to improve product performance in each criterion, such as energy, water and manufacturing. The setting of these targets allows the innovation team to make changes to meet those performance expectations.

Summary

We can learn from the appliance sector in their successful development of product sustainability standards to inform product innovation within their companies.

The advancements they employed of collaborative stakeholder engagement, broadening the screening scope, and hotspots analysis informing specific targets are transferrable to any other sector and can serve as a guide for other companies developing their product sustainability toolbox.

More Information

[1] Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM)

-Based on the chapter section written by Jim Fava

Refer to Greener Products: The Making and Marketing of Sustainable Brands by Al Iannuzzi for the full scope of discussion on product sustainability best practices and advancements.

Stay tuned for the next instalment in our Greener Products series discussing collaboration.

Contact us

We'd love to hear from you

Anthesis has offices in the U.S., Canada, Colombia, the UK, Ireland, Italy, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Andorra, Finland, China, the Philippines and the Middle East.

[hubspot type=form portal=3887711 id=615ca462-bdcc-4537-8360-ec12f2372585]

Streamlined Lifecycle Assessment Tools

November 30, 2017 | Guidance,
[DISPLAY_ULTIMATE_SOCIAL_ICONS]

How a product is designed can determine up to 80 percent of its environmental impacts.

With the main environmental and social impacts of their products and activities usually embedded in their supply chains, businesses cannot significantly improve their sustainability without improving their products and packaging.

Streamlined Lifecycle Assessments

Carrying out lifecycle assessments (LCAs) is a time and cost-intensive task. Current LCA tools are challenging to use early in a product design process – a time when key decisions are being made. For this reason, businesses are simplifying this process by using a more strategic form of LCA known as ‘Streamlined LCA’.

This is a solution which:

  • Identifies and focuses in on the main impacts in relation to a product or process, and allows key issues to be explored in more detail where necessary.
  • Provides an agile and cost-effective alternative.
  • Uses a combination of qualitative and quantitative approaches to evaluate impacts.
  • Allows the user to “design out” the main impacts of a product through the lifecycle.

Is Streamlined LCA Right for You?

Our experience tells us that companies can benefit from the streamlined LCA approach in many instances, including if business are:

  • Want actionable and accessible information from your LCAs
  • Perform multiple LCAs
  • Have numerous product lines
  • Have complex products
  • Think in terms of business KPIs like “zero waste” and “zero virgin fibre” that go beyond carbon and the scope of traditional LCA tools
  • Are concerned about your scope three sustainability
  • Want to improve the sustainability of your packaging.

Contact us

We'd love to hear from you

Anthesis has offices in the U.S., Canada, Colombia, the UK, Ireland, Italy, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Andorra, Finland, China, the Philippines and the Middle East.

[hubspot type=form portal=3887711 id=615ca462-bdcc-4537-8360-ec12f2372585]

The Product Sustainability Round Table

November 21, 2017 | Guidance,
[DISPLAY_ULTIMATE_SOCIAL_ICONS]
Logos of client companies

The Product Sustainability Round Table is a community of cross-industry sustainability experts and thought leaders from leading global companies that has been operating for over 25 years.

The PSRT Approach

Members of the Product Sustainability Round Table (PSRT) meet both virtually and face-to-face, taking turns to host meetings across North America and Europe to enable dynamic benchmarking and expert insights from member companies, external speakers and Anthesis advisors.

Members work together to:

  • Track and deepen their understanding of emerging sustainability trends and issues, and identify thought leadership resources.
  • Openly share collective experiences, successes and failures.
  • Understand how others are realising business value by mainstreaming sustainability.
  • Collaborate on best practices, tools, and solutions.

With more cross-value chain and cross industry communication and knowledge sharing than can be afforded by other industry groups, members are able to quickly understand new developments and value chain perspectives, learn from leading companies and shorten their learning curves, and forge stronger relationships with value chain partners.

In addition, by engaging with a network of aligned companies, the PSRT provides much greater value than any standalone strategy or benchmarking engagement can provide.

Topics Covered by the PSRT in 2017

  • Political Climate: from Globalisation to Localisation
  • Ambitious and Meaningful Target Setting: SBTs
  • Embedding Sustainability into Existing Functions
  • Product Impacts and Opportunities (‘Hotspotting’)
  • New Product Development and Improvement
  • Sustainability-Driven Breakthrough Innovation
  • Operationalising Circular Economy
  • Disruptive Technology and Business Mode
  • Responsible and Sustainable Supply Chains
  • Sustainable Chemistry and Materials of Concern
  • Social Value and Impact
  • Climate Change and the Energy Transition
  • Sustainability Data, Analytics and Disclosure
  • Sustainable Buildings and Communities
  • Managing Customer Requests
  • GTM & Communications Strategies

Membership

PSRT members are a global group of companies with a vision to drive continuous improvement and connect product sustainability priorities to market value. Relationships which begin at PSRT meetings often forge into long-term partnerships.

Full PSRT membership costs US $14,000 per organisation per calendar year.

Contact us

We'd love to hear from you

Anthesis has offices in the U.S., Canada, Colombia, the UK, Ireland, Italy, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Andorra, Finland, China, the Philippines and the Middle East.

[hubspot type=form portal=3887711 id=615ca462-bdcc-4537-8360-ec12f2372585]